#mcsayouthintervention

The Montreal Council of Social Agencies and its Effect on Youth Crime and Drug Use

Related Incidents in Canada and Elsewhere

Social welfare advocates have devoted widespread attention to the emergence of social problems among youth and within the community as a whole, including counseling, shelter, and food, among other services. There are many reasons why public officials might favor treating recent social problems with a straightforward desire to put helpful programs in place quickly. While programs such as J.O.Y, can help reduce the numbers of youth crime, there has been a number of other comparable and related programs and agencies that were put in place in Canada with a particular emphasis on meeting the needs of the nation’s communities.

National Program for Voluntary Action 

On August 28 1969, the National Program for Voluntary Action was created as a means of encouraging greater voluntary effort to meet the needs of the nation’s communities.[1] It established on making available requests and information on successful voluntary projects. The office of voluntary action was in search for reports on any projects that fit the simple needs of achieving measurable results in helping improve the quality of living in a particular community.[2] Its success has resulted from voluntary effort and resources and whether or not the way in which it operates could be duplicated elsewhere.[3] It was opportunities like this that allowed the emergence of certain social agencies and councils to develop such as the Regional Welfare Council.

The Regional Welfare Council 

Similarly, the Regional Welfare Council aimed at promoting social development through participant social planning.[4] They concede eight specific roles as logical consequences of their basic objective, and thus required them to be met. Their primary role was to cover all questions related to social development that covered multiple dimensions of social policies and emergency situations in every area.[5] If the social plan in question met the requirements, such as promoting the efficiency of community services and social participation particularly of the under privilege, the council will catalyze the most urgent needs.[6] Thus, the conscious efforts were made by Canada to promote awareness of social issues, and called on communities to improve those issues and conditions.

Diabetic Camps 

The creation of Diabetic Camps is an ideal example in terms of how communities were improving social issues. The first diabetic camp opened in Quebec by eight doctors who were interested in this subject.[7] The clubs that were established were ran by volunteer members of the community and volunteer doctors when most summer camps refused diabetic kids due to their illness and its demands.[8] The camps excelled at allowing diabetic children to participate in regular activities, giving them a sense of belonging while informing them on how to examine and control their diabetes.[9] In result, the concept of diabetic camps grew with the demand of students and the issuing of new camps expanded both nationally and internationally. Fifty camps were established in North America and four in Ontario alone during this time. [10]

Footnotes:

[1] National Program for Voluntary Action, August 28 1969, Family and Social Welfare, Box: 20, File: Government correspondence in Quebec, Montreal Social Agencies, McGill University Archives.

[2] Ibid.

[3] Ibid.

[4] Regional Welfare Council, Family and Social Welfare, Box: 20, File: Government correspondence in Quebec, Montreal Social Agencies, McGill University Archives.

[5] Ibid.

[6] Regional Welfare Council, Family and Social Welfare, Box: 20, File: Government correspondence in Quebec, Montreal Social Agencies, McGill University Archives.

[7] Diabetic Camps, Family and Social Welfare, Box: 20, File: Government correspondence in Quebec, Montreal Social Agencies, McGill University Archives.

[8] Ibid.

[9] Ibid.

[10] Ibid.

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